Update to Form N-470, Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Purposes; New Edition Dated 09/10/19.

Use this form if you are a lawful permanent resident who must leave the United States for a period of one year or longer for certain employment purposes and you want to preserve your status as an immigrant to pursue naturalization.

Note: If you are eligible for naturalization under section 319(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) because you are married to a U.S. citizen working for certain organizations overseas, you are exempt from establishing the naturalization residency and physical presence requirements. Therefore, you are not required to file Form N-470. Please visit uscis.gov/n-400 for more information on applying for naturalization under section 319(b) of the INA.

Number of Pages

Form 7; instructions 9.

Edition Date

09/10/19. We will also accept the 12/23/16 edition. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the form and instructions.

Where to File

For U.S. Postal Service (USPS):

USCIS
P.O. Box 650809
Dallas, TX 75265

For FedEx, UPS, and DHL deliveries:

USCIS
Attn: N-470
2501 S. State Hwy.121, Business
Suite 400
Lewisville, TX 75067

Filing Tips for Form N-470, Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Purposes

Complete all sections of the form. We will reject the form if these fields are missing:

  • Part 5 – Interpreter’s Contact Information, Certification, and Signature
    • Interpreter’s Signature (if applicable)
  • Part 6 – Contact Information, Declaration, and Signature of the Person Preparing this Application, if Other Than the Applicant
    • Preparer’s Signature (if applicable)

Don’t forget to sign your form! We will reject any unsigned form.

Filing Fee

$355. You may pay the fee with a money order, personal check, or cashier’s check.  When filing at a USCIS Lockbox facility, you may also pay by credit card using Form G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transactions. If you pay by check, you must make your check payable to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Please note that service centers are not able to process credit card payments.

When you send a payment, you agree to pay for a government service. Filing and biometric service fees are final and non-refundable, regardless of any action we take on your application, petition, or request, or if you withdraw your request. Use our Fee Calculator to help determine your fee.

Special Instructions

Attorney or representative: You may be represented, at no expense to the U.S. government, by an attorney or other duly authorized representative. Your representative must submit Form G-28, Notice of Entry or Appearance as Attorney or Representative, with your Form N-470. Your representative may also submit Form G-28 at the time of your interview.

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Update to Form N-400, Application for Naturalization; New Edition Dated 09/17/19.

Use this form to apply for U.S. citizenship.

Number of Pages

Form 20; instructions 18.

Edition Date

09/17/19. Starting 12/16/19, we will only accept the 09/17/19 edition. Until then, you can use the 12/23/16 edition. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the form and instructions.

Where to File

You generally have two options for filing your Form N-400 with USCIS:

  • Online, or
  • By mail (paper).

1. Filing your Form N-400 online

If you are applying based on your military service, are applying from outside of the U.S., or are applying for a fee waiver or reduced fee, you cannot file your Form N-400 online. Please see section 2 or 3 below for how to file your form by mail.

Otherwise, you must create an online account to file your Form N-400 online. Having an online account will also allow you to:

  • Pay your filing fee online;
  • Check the status of your case;
  • Receive notifications and case updates;
  • View personalized case completion date estimates;
  • Respond to requests for evidence; and
  • Manage your contact information, including updating your address.

Note for Attorneys and Accredited Representatives: You can also create an online account, which will allow you to manage all of your clients’ applications in one place.

2.  Filing your Form N-400 by mail

If you are applying based on being a current or former member of the military, a spouse of a current member of the military, or a close relative of a deceased member of the military, do not use this chart. Go to section 3 below to see where you must mail your form.

All other applicants must use the chart below.

If you submit Form N-400 on paper, you will receive a USCIS Account Acceptance Notice in the mail with instructions on how to create an online account to track and manage your case.  We will process your application even if you do not create an online account, but we encourage you to create and access your online account. We will continue to mail you copies of notifications about your case.

If you live in:

Mail your form to:

Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Micronesia
Guam
Hawaii
Idaho
Kansas
Mariana Islands
Montana
North Dakota
Nebraska
Nevada
Oregon
Utah
Washington
Wyoming

For U.S. Postal Service (USPS):

USCIS
P.O. Box 21251
Phoenix, AZ 85036

For FedEx, UPS, and DHL deliveries:

USCIS
Attn: N-400
1820 E. Skyharbor Circle S
Suite 100
Phoenix, AZ 85034

If you live in:

Mail your form to:

Alabama
Arkansas
Connecticut
District. Of Columbia
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
Louisiana
Massachusetts
Maryland
Maine
Mississippi
North Carolina
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
Oklahoma
Puerto Rico
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
Virgin Islands
Vermont
West Virginia

For U.S. Postal Service (USPS):

USCIS
P.O. Box 660060
Dallas, TX 75266

For FedEx, UPS, and DHL deliveries:

USCIS
Attn: N-400
2501 S State Hwy 121 Business
Suite 400
Lewisville, TX 75067

If you live in:

Mail your form to:

Illinois
Indiana
Wisconsin
Iowa
Michigan
Minnesota
Ohio
Missouri
Pennsylvania

For U.S. Postal Service (USPS):

USCIS
P.O. Box 4380
Chicago, IL 60680-4380

For FedEx, UPS, and DHL deliveries:

USCIS
Attn: N-400
131 S. Dearborn, 3rd Floor
Chicago, IL 60603-5517

3.  If you are applying based on being a current or former member of the military, a spouse of a current member of the military, or a close relative of a deceased member of the military,file your application at the location listed below:

For U.S. Postal Service (USPS):

          USCIS
          P.O. Box 4446
          Chicago, IL 60680-4446

For FedEx, UPS, or DHL deliveries:

          USCIS
          Attn: Military N-400
          131 S. Dearborn, 3rd Floor
          Chicago, IL 60603-5517

If you submit Form N-400 on paper, you will receive a USCIS Account Acceptance Notice in the mail with instructions on how to create an online account to track and manage your case.  We will process your application even if you do not create an online account, but we encourage you to create and access your online account. We will continue to mail you copies of notifications about your case.

Filing Tips: Go to our Form Filing Tips page for information on how to help ensure we will accept your application.

Don’t forget to sign your form! We will reject any unsigned form.

Filing Fee

$640. (Add the $85 biometric fee for a total of $725, where applicable. See exceptions below.) If you file your Form N-400 online, you may pay your fee online. If you file your Form N-400 by mail (paper), you may pay the fee with a money order, personal check, cashier’s check, or by credit card using Form G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transactions. If you pay by check, you must make your check payable to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

When you send a payment, you agree to pay for a government service. Filing and biometric service fees are final and non-refundable, regardless of any action we take on your application, petition, or request, or if you withdraw your request. Use our Fee Calculator to help determine your fee.

Exceptions:

  • Applicants 75 years of age or older do not need to pay a biometric fee. They only need to pay the $640 filing fee.
  • No fee is required for military applicants filing under section 328 or 329 of the INA.

Checklist of Required Initial Evidence (for informational purposes only)

Please do not submit this checklist with your Form N-400. It is an optional tool to use as you prepare your form, but does not replace statutory, regulatory, and form instruction requirements. We recommend that you review these requirements before completing and submitting your form. Do not send original documents unless specifically requested in the form instructions or applicable regulations.

If you submit any documents (copies or original documents, if requested) in a foreign language, you must include a full English translation along with a certification from the translator verifying that the translation is complete and accurate, and that they are competent to translate from the foreign language to English.

Did you provide the following?

  • A copy of your Permanent Resident Card
  • A copy of your marriage certificate (if applicable)
  • Form N-426, Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service (if applying for naturalization based on military service)
  • DD Form 214, NGB Form 22, or discharge orders (if applying for naturalization based on military service and separated from service)
  • A copy of your official military orders (if applying for naturalization based on military service and currently serving)
  • Evidence of your citizen spouse’s employment abroad (if applying under 319(b))
  • Two passport-style photographs (if you reside outside the United States)

Special Instructions

  • Read A Guide to Naturalization (Form M-476) carefully before filing this form. The Form N-400 instructions often refer to information in the guide, and it provides important information about citizenship eligibility requirements and processing procedures.
  • Biometrics: Individuals who file Form N-400 and later appear at an application support center (ASC) for biometric capturing are required to submit to a photograph and signature process. If we determine you are eligible for naturalization, we may use the photograph taken at the ASC on your Certificate of Naturalization. Therefore, we recommend that on the day of your ASC appointment, you dress in clothing that is acceptable for display on your Certificate of Naturalization. We will not reject a photograph based solely upon your desire to modify the photograph shown on your certificate.
  • Photographs: Based on processing needs, you may need to submit physical passport photographs after you have already filed your Form N-400. We will send you a request for physical photographs with instructions on how to submit them.
  • Download the form: This version of the Form N-400 is available above in two files – the instructions and the form itself. We recommend that you download the form directly to your local computer instead of completing it on your web browser.
  • Attorney or representative: You may be represented, at no expense to the U.S. government, by an attorney or other duly authorized representative. Your representative must submit Form G-28, Notice of Entry or Appearance as Attorney or Representative, with your Form N-400.  Your representative may also submit Form G-28 at the time of your interview.
  • Lost or Expiring Permanent Resident Card: If you lost your Permanent Resident Card or your card expired, you generally must still file Form I-90 even if you have applied for naturalization. However, if you properly file Form I-90 or you filed your Form N-400 at least six months before your Permanent Resident Card expired, we may issue you an Alien Documentation, Identification & Telecommunications (ADIT) stamp as temporary proof of your lawful permanent resident status. 
     

Related Links

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Update to Form EOIR-29, Notice of Appeal to the Board of Immigration Appeals from a Decision of a DHS Officer; New Edition Dated July 2019.

Use this form to appeal a USCIS decision on a Form I-130 or Form I-360 (Widow(er).

Note: An attorney or an accredited representative of an organization recognized by the Board of Immigration Appeals must file a separate notice of appearance on behalf of the petitioner (Form EOIR-27) with EOIR-29.

Do not use this form to appeal a Department of State overseas consular officer’s denial of your visa application (for example, DS-157, DS-230, or DS-260). For information about visa application denials, please reference the Department of State website.

Number of Pages

Form 1; instructions 1

Edition Date

July 2019. (We will still accept the following editions: March 2018, July 2015, January 2015, October 2013, October 2012, and April 2009).

Where to File

Follow the instructions in the decision letter from USCIS.

Filing Fee

$110.

When you send a payment, you agree to pay for a government service. Filing and biometric service fees are final and non-refundable, regardless of any action we take on your application, petition, or request, or if you withdraw your request.

If you file at a USCIS Lockbox or service center: Pay the fee with a money order, personal check, cashier’s check, or by credit card using Form G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transactions. If you pay by check, you must make your check payable to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Please note that service centers are not able to process credit card payments. Use our Fee Calculator to help determine your fee.

If you file at a field office: You can only pay with a personal check, debit card, credit card, or a reloadable prepaid credit/debit card.

Special Instructions

To ensure your form is accepted, make sure you include a copy of the denial letter you received from USCIS.

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Cuccinelli Announces USCIS’ FY 2019 Accomplishments and Efforts to Implement President Trump’s Goals

Release Date:

WASHINGTON—U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) today released preliminary fiscal year 2019 agency statistics, accomplishments and efforts to implement President Trump’s agenda. These preliminary statistics highlight important immigration trends and illustrate the work accomplished by USCIS in FY 2019. The agency will publish final, verified FY 2019 statistics later next month.

“FY 2019 has been a historic year for USCIS and we have achieved many of President Trump’s goals to make our immigration system work better for America. As an agency, we have worked hand-in-hand with our fellow DHS components to answer President Trump’s call to address the ongoing crisis at our southern border. In the face of congressional inaction, we’ve taken significant steps to mitigate the loopholes in our asylum system, combat fraudulent claims and strengthen the protections we have in place to preserve humanitarian assistance for those truly in need of it,” said USCIS Acting Director Ken Cuccinelli. “Meanwhile, the men and women of USCIS continue to administer our nation’s lawful immigration system, processing a large number of applications and requests while naturalizing 833,000 new U.S. citizens, an 11-year high.

“In the coming year, we will continue to use every tool available to us to deliver on President Trump’s promises to the American people. We will continue to fulfill his goals to strengthen our nation’s strained immigration system and alleviate the crisis at our border while the agency continues to fairly and efficiently adjudicate the applications of those seeking lawful status in the U.S.”

Crisis Response and Asylum Reform

Absent congressional action to provide targeted fixes to our immigration system, USCIS rushed personnel and resources to our southern border and implemented a number of significant policy changes and reforms designed to help reduce the loopholes in our nation’s asylum system that allowed for crisis levels of abuse and exploitation.

Major Policy Reforms

  • Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP): MPP was established by the Trump Administration in January 2019 to restore a safe and orderly immigration process along the U.S. southern border and decrease the number of aliens attempting to game the immigration system. Under MPP, aliens attempting to enter the U.S. from Mexico without proper documentation may be returned to Mexico to wait outside of the U.S. during their immigration proceedings.

  • Third Country Transit Asylum Rule: In July, DHS and DOJ published a joint interim final rule to enhance the integrity of the asylum process by placing further restrictions or limitations on eligibility for aliens who seek asylum in the United States. Specifically, with limited exceptions, the rule bars aliens, who entered along the southern border, from receiving asylum in the U.S. if they did not apply for asylum in at least one other country they transited through. This rule aims to mitigate the crisis at the border by better identifying and serving legitimate asylum seekers.

Credible Fear

  • In FY 2019, the Asylum Division received more than 105,000 credible fear cases – over 5,000 more than in FY 2018 and a new record high.
  • The top five countries asylum officers processed credible fear claims from: Honduras, Cuba, Guatemala, El Salvador and India.

Asylum Workforce

  • In FY 2019, USCIS executed an ambitious plan to hire 500 staff for the Asylum Division by the end of December 2019 to reach authorized staffing levels. New strategies are in development to more specifically target individuals with relevant experience and skill sets, including those with prior military and law enforcement expertise.
  • During any given week in FY 2019, 60-90 USCIS employees were assigned to detention facilities or Border Patrol stations along the southwest border, including about 40-60 asylum officers.
  • The Asylum Division trained and deployed U.S. Border Patrol agents and USCIS officers from outside the Asylum Division to supplement staffing on the southern border and assist with the Asylum Division’s workload.

Refugee Processing

  • USCIS processed tens of thousands of refugees overseas, work that contributed to meeting the 30,000 refugee admissions ceiling for FY 2019.
  • USCIS conducted a successful pilot program to validate the identity of refugee applicants using UNHCR biometric records.

Crisis Deployments

  • In FY 2019, USCIS sent 400 employee volunteers to assist with the federal government’s overall efforts responding to critical DHS needs.
  • 233 of these volunteers were deployed directly to the nation’s southern border through the DHS Volunteer Force in support of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Others were deployed to offices across the country providing critical legal services and mission support to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Protecting American Workers and Taxpayers

Public Charge

In August, USCIS announced the publication of the Final Rule on Inadmissibility on Public Charge Grounds, a rule that enforces long-standing law to better ensure that those seeking to come to, or stay in, the United States are self-sufficient. With this new rule, DHS defined public charge to mean an alien who receives one or more designated public benefits for more than 12 months, in the aggregate, within any 36-month period (such that, for instance, receipt of two benefits in one month counts as two months). Under the new regulation, USCIS sought to evaluate applications to better ensure that aliens seeking to come to, or remain in, the United States are able to successfully support themselves through their own capabilities and through the resources of their families, sponsors, and private organizations rather than rely on public benefit programs supported by taxpayers.

On Oct. 11 and Oct. 14, 2019, judges in eight separate cases before U.S. District Courts for the Southern District of New York, Northern District of California, Eastern District of Washington, Northern District of Illinois, and District of Maryland enjoined DHS from implementing and enforcing this final rule and postponed the effective date until a final resolution of the litigation.

EB-5 Reform

In July, USCIS published a final rule that made a number of significant changes to the agency’s EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program. Under the EB-5 program, individuals are eligible to apply for conditional lawful permanent residence in the United States if they make the necessary investment in a new commercial enterprise in the United States and create 10 full-time jobs for qualified U.S. workers. The reforms made to the program this year increase the minimum investment level to account for inflation over the past three decades and substantially restrict the possibility of gerrymandering targeted employment areas that qualify for a reduced investment amount, ensuring that the incentive is reserved for rural and high-unemployment areas most in need.

Securing the Homeland

Vetting and Screening

Consistent with President Trump’s call for enhanced vetting, USCIS plays a key role in safeguarding our nation’s immigration system and making sure that only those who are eligible for a benefit receive it. USCIS is vigorous in its efforts to detect and deter immigration fraud, using a variety of vetting and screening processes to confirm an applicant’s identity and eligibility. The agency also conducts site visits, interviews applicants, and requests evidence for benefits that offer individuals status in the United States.

  • In FY 2019, USCIS expanded certain screening procedures to address President Trump’s Executive Order 13780, “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States.” This includes additional vetting for naturalization and permanent residence applicants.
  • USCIS personnel completed more than 8,000 site visits as part of the Targeted Site Visit and Verification Program.
  • Referrals to the Fraud Detection and National Security Directorate  from field offices surpassed FY 2018 levels by more than 22%.
  • The primary background screening system for USCIS (known as ATLAS) processed more than 16.5 million screenings, through law enforcement and other federal databases, generating approximately 124,000 automated potential fraud, public safety and national security detections requiring further analysis and manual review by USCIS officers.
  • FDNS continued leveraging open source and publicly available social media information to investigate potential fraud, national security and public safety concerns with approximately 11,420 checks completed in FY 2019.

Large Workload

From the beginning of FY 2019 through August 2019, USCIS adjudicated nearly 7.5 million requests for immigration benefits, which is a 14% increase over the last fiscal year. However, data for September 2019 is not yet available. The verified final totals will be released later next month.

USCIS also naturalized 833,000 new citizens in FY 2019 – an 11-year high in new oaths of citizenship.

USCIS granted lawful permanent residence to 582,000 individuals and processed more than 2.1 million employment authorization applications. The agency also verified more than 40 million new hires through E-Verify.

From the start of FY 2019 through August 2019, the backlogs for Green Cards and naturalizations were reduced by 25% and 20% respectively.

Modernization

Online Filing

The agency’s transition from paper applications to a fully digital experience continues to be an important priority for USCIS. Consequently, USCIS continues to expand our online filing capabilities.

  • In FY 2019, 1,214,300 applications were filed online, a 10.4% increase from the 1,100,242 filed in FY 2018.
  • USCIS added three forms (N-600, N-600K, and I-539) during FY 2019 for a total of eight forms (I-90, I-131A, N-336, N-400, N-565, N-600, N-600K and I-551) available now for online filing.
  • USCIS plans to add several more forms for electronic filing during FY 2020, including the I-485, I-765, I-131, I-129 and I-589.
  • Additionally, USCIS stood up FIRST, the federal government’s first fully electronic FOIA/Privacy Act request and delivery system that allows users to submit and track FOIA requests and receive documents digitally. In FY 2019, more than 26,000 electronic responses have been delivered to indivduals with online accounts.

Information Services Modernization Program

In FY 2019, USCIS expanded the Information Services Modernization Program (InfoMod). InfoMod saves both applicants and the agency time by enabling hundreds of thousands applicants who would have otherwise required an in-person appointment at a USCIS office to have their inquiries answered through the agency’s suite of self-help tools online and over the phone. Under InfoMod, applicants still in need of in-person appointment services for certain issues, such as emergency travel documentation, are now able to schedule appointments without being turned away due to lack of availability. 

Self-Help Tools

USCIS has continued to expand and enhance the self-help tools available to applicants online and through the agency’s Contact Center with the goal of providing more efficient, timely service. Due to these improvements, USCIS has seen an 13% increase in the number of individuals using USCIS’ digital tools since FY 2018. The number of myUSCIS sessions reached 35,138,900 in FY 2019 compared, with 31,079,323 in FY 2018.

For more information on USCIS and our programs, please visit uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), Instagram (/uscis), YouTube (/uscis), and Facebook (/uscis).

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USCIS Clarifies Special Immigrant Juvenile Classification to Better Ensure Victims of Abuse, Neglect and Abandonment Receive Protection

Release Date:

WASHINGTON—U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services today clarified requirements regarding the Special Immigrant Juvenile (SIJ) classification. 

To ensure consistency surrounding this classification, USCIS is issuing three Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) adopted decisions. Through these adopted decisions, USCIS clarifies that it requires evidence of a court’s intervention to provide relief from abuse, neglect or abandonment beyond a statement that the juvenile is dependent on the court. This level of intervention from the court serves as an indicator as to whether the SIJ classification is sought for its intended purpose of relief from parental abuse, neglect or abandonment and not primarily to obtain an immigration benefit. Many juvenile court orders already contain this level of detail.

USCIS also clarifies that it will consider qualifying orders from state courts, provided the petitioner met the applicable definition of a juvenile under state law when the order was issued and the court determined the juvenile was subject to parental abuse, neglect, abandonment or similar maltreatment. These clarifications will provide guidance to adjudicators in evaluating juvenile court orders issued under different state laws in the adjudication of petitions for federal SIJ classification. 

Additionally, USCIS is no longer requiring evidence that a state court had the authority to place a petitioner in the custody of an unfit parent in order to make a qualifying determination regarding parental reunification for purposes of SIJ classification.

“Through these clarifications, USCIS adjudicators will help ensure those who are victims and truly need protection from abuse, neglect, abandonment or a similar basis under state law receive the assistance they need,” said USCIS Acting Director Ken Cuccinelli. “These new clarifications will better protect deserving juvenile immigrants while also promoting program integrity and upholding our laws.  Congress needs to address loopholes in the SIJ program to better protect children.”

USCIS will also reopen the comment period for the proposed rule, Special Immigrant Juvenile Petitions, for 30 days to gather more information so it can clarify SIJ requirements by rulemaking. USCIS will accept comments through Nov. 15, 2019.  In recent years, the SIJ classification has increasingly been sought by juvenile and young adult immigrants solely for the purposes of obtaining lawful immigration status and not due to abuse, neglect or abandonment by their parents.  Through this rulemaking, USCIS seeks to realign the SIJ classification with congressional intent, implement statutorily mandated changes and address shortcomings in the regulations that threaten the integrity of the SIJ program.

USCIS acknowledges the potential for reliance interests; however, these three adopted AAO decisions do not create legally binding rights or change substantive requirements. They will go into effect on Oct. 15, 2019 and will apply to pending and future petitions. Related materials are available to the public: the three adopted AAO decisions, and the Special Immigrant Juvenile Petitions proposed rule, 76 FR 54978 (PDF).

The SIJ classification was established by Congress in 1990 to provide a pathway to legal status for children in the U.S. foster care system who required court intervention to protect them from parental abuse, abandonment or neglect. While there is no limit on the number of SIJ petitions that USCIS is able to approve each year, there is a limit to the number of SIJ-based adjustments that USCIS may approve due to visa availability. For the past several years, USCIS has granted approximately 5,000 SIJ adjustments each year.

For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit uscis.gov or follow them on Twitter (@uscis), Instagram (/uscis), YouTube (/uscis), Facebook (/uscis) and LinkedIn (/uscis).

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