Update to I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status; New Edition Dated 07/15/19.

Use this form to apply for lawful permanent resident status if you are in the United States.

Number of Pages

Form 18; instructions 43

Edition Date

07/15/19. We will also accept the 12/13/17 edition. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the form and instructions.

Where to File

Filing Fee

You may pay the fee with a money order, personal check, or cashier’s check. When filing at a USCIS Lockbox facility, you may also pay by credit card using Form G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transactions. If you pay by check, you must make your check payable to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Service centers are not able to process credit card payments. 

When you send a payment, you agree to pay for a government service. Filing and biometric service fees are final and non-refundable, regardless of any action we take on your application, petition, or request, or if you withdraw your request. Use our Fee Calculator to help determine your fee.

Read our Paying USCIS Fees page for more details.

If You Are…

Form Fee

Biometric
Services Fee

Total

Under 14 and filing with the I-485
application of at least one parent

$750

$0

$750

Under 14 and not filing with the I-485 application of at least one parent

$1,140

$0

$1,140

Age 14 – 78

$1,140

$85

$1,225

Age 79 or older

$1,140

$0

$1,140

Filing Form I-485 based on having been admitted to the United States as a refugee

$0

$0

$0

Checklist of Required Initial Evidence (for informational purposes only)

View the checklist of required initial evidence.

Special Instructions

If you are seeking to adjust status under the provisions of section 245(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, refer to Supplement A for additional instructions. 

Filing I-485 Supplement J

If you are filing Form I-485 together with a Form I-140 that names you as the principal beneficiary, you do not need to file Supplement J.

However, you must file Supplement J if you are filing Form I-485 based on a previously filed Form I-140 or if you are requesting job portability to a new, permanent job offer under INA section 204(j). Go to the Form I-485, Supplement J page for specific instructions on when and how to file Supplement J.

Filing Forms I-765 and I-131 with Form I-485

If you are filing Form I-485 and pay the required fee (or already filed Form I-485 and paid the required fee on or after July 30, 2007), you do not have to pay an additional fee to also file a Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization and/or Form I-131, Application for Travel Document for advance parole. You may file these forms together. If you choose not to file Form I-765 and/or Form I-131 with your Form I-485, then you must submit a copy of your I-797C, Notice of Action, receipt as evidence that you filed a Form I-485.

If you filed your Form I-485 before July 30, 2007, you must pay the fees associated with Forms I-765 and/or I-131 when you file them.

Which Box to Check in Part 2 of Form I-485

Before filing a Form I-485 based on a family-sponsored or employment-based preference category, check the USCIS webpage about the Visa Bulletin to see if your priority date makes you eligible to apply. If your priority date makes you eligible to apply, then:

  • If you are the principal applicant, check the appropriate box in Part 2, Item Numbers 1.a. through 1.g. of Form I 485.
  • If you are the derivative spouse or child of the principal applicant, check the appropriate box in Part 2, Item Numbers 1.a. through 1.g. of Form I 485 and complete Part 2, Item Numbers 5.a. through 9.

For more information on the Visa Bulletin or the charts, please go to the Visa Availability and Priority Dates page and the Adjustment of Status Filing Charts from the Visa Bulletin page.

Premium Processing

You may file Form I-485 and Form I-140 together at the USCIS Dallas Lockbox facility.

If you are requesting premium processing for Form I-140, you must also file Form I 907, Request for Premium Processing Service. Refer to the Direct Filing Addresses for Form I-140, Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker if you want to file Forms I-485, I-140, and I 907 together. Do NOT file Form I-907 at a USCIS Lockbox facility.

If you are filing Form I-485 based on a pending or approved Form I-140, go to the Direct Filing Addresses for Form I-485 page to see where to file your application. 

Read the Employment-Based Preferences chart in the Department of State’s Visa Bulletin to ensure your priority date is current before you file your application.

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Update to Form I-485 Supplement A, Adjustment of Status Under Section 245(i); New Edition Dated 07/15/19.

Use this form to provide USCIS with additional information if you are seeking to adjust status under section 245(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

Number of Pages

Form 4; instructions 11.

Edition Date

07/15/19. We will also accept the 12/13/17 edition. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the form and instructions.

Where to File

Filing Fee

$1,000. This fee is in addition to the fee required for your Form I-485. If you have filed Form I-485 separately, attach a copy of your filing receipt and pay only the additional fee of $1,000.

You may pay the fee with a money order, personal check, or cashier’s check. When filing at a USCIS Lockbox facility, you may also pay by credit card using Form G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transactions. If you pay by check, you must make your check payable to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Service centers are not able to process credit card payments.

When you send a payment, you agree to pay for a government service. Filing and biometric service fees are final and non-refundable, regardless of any action we take on your application, petition, or request, or if you withdraw your request. Use our Fee Calculator to help determine your fee.

There is no fee if you are:

  • An unmarried child under 17 years of age, or
  • The spouse or the unmarried child under 21 years of age of a legalized alien and you are qualified for and have applied for voluntary departure under the family unity program.

Read our Paying USCIS Fees page for more details.

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Update to Form I-485 Supplement J, Confirmation of Bona Fide Job Offer or Request for Job Portability Under INA Section 204(j); New Edition Dated 07/15/19.

Number of Pages

Form 7; instructions 8

Edition Date

07/15/19. We will also accept the 12/13/17 edition. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the form and instructions.

Where to File

If you are filing a Form I-485 without the Form I-140, or if you are requesting job portability based on a Form I-485 that has been pending with USCIS for 180 days or more, file Supplement J at the filing address for your Form I 485. Review the Direct Filing Addresses for Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status page to determine where to file your form, and see the Special Instructions section of this page for information about when to file Supplement J.

If we sent you a Request for Evidence (RFE) or a Notice of Intent to Deny (NOID) requesting that you file Supplement J, please submit it with your response to the RFE or NOID at the address specified.

Filing Fee

Special Instructions

When to File Supplement J

If you are filing Form I-485 together with a Form I-140 that names you as the principal beneficiary, you do not need to file Supplement J.

If you are filing Form I-485 based on a previously filed Form I-140, you must file Supplement J when:

  • You initially file your employment-based Form I-485 with USCIS; or
  • We send you a Request for Evidence (RFE) or a Notice of Intent to Deny (NOID).  

We may also request that you file Supplement J again before we make a final decision on your Form I-485.

If you are requesting job portability to a new, permanent job offer under INA section 204(j), you may file Supplement J only after:

  • You have properly filed a Form I-485 based on an approved or pending Form I-140 that names you as the principal beneficiary;
  • The Form I-485 has been pending with USCIS for 180 days or more since the receipt date; and
  • You have received:
    • A new, permanent job offer from a U.S. employer that is in the same or similar occupational classification as the job offered to you in the original Form I-140, and you would like to request that we use the new job offer when making a decision on your Form I-485; or
    • An RFE or a NOID from USCIS regarding your pending Form I-485 that asks for confirmation that the job offered to you in the Form I-140 or a previously filed Supplement J is still available to you; or
    • A NOID from USCIS regarding your Form I-485 because the petitioner has withdrawn the Form I-140 filed for you, or the petitioner of your Form I-140 has gone out of business.

Filing Tips

  • It is very important that you submit a completed Supplement J, especially including the beneficiary and the employer’s physical address. Submitting the form with incorrect addresses, such as using an attorney’s address instead of the employer’s physical address, or with missing information may result in us issuing you an RFE, which will delay the processing of your Form I-485.
  • Go to our Form Filing Tips page for information on how to help ensure that we will accept your application.

Track the Status of Your Supplement J

You will receive a receipt number when you file Supplement J. You can use this number to check the status of your form on our Case Status Online webpage.

You may call the USCIS Contact Center at 800-375-5283 for information on the status of your Supplement J under these circumstances:

If you filed Supplement J… You may contact the USCIS Contact Center…
Together with Form I-485 After the processing time shown on the USCIS Processing Time Information webpage has passed and you have not received a decision. You must provide the USCIS Contact Center with information from your Form I-485 receipt notice.
To request job portability After 120 days from the date shown on the Supplement J receipt notice.

VIBE

We may use Validation Instrument for Business Enterprises (VIBE) to validate the basic information about the companies or organizations listed on the Supplement J. For more information, please visit uscis.gov/vibe.

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USCIS Returns Unselected Fiscal Year 2020 H-1B Cap-Subject Petitions

USCIS has returned all fiscal year (FY) 2020 H-1B cap-subject petitions that were not selected in our computer-generated random selection process. On May 17, USCIS announced that it had completed data entry of all selected H-1B cap-subject petitions for FY 2020.

If you submitted an FY 2020 H-1B cap-subject petition that was delivered to USCIS between April 1 and April 5, 2019, and you have not received a receipt notice or a returned petition by August 29, you may contact USCIS for assistance.

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USCIS Announces Final Rule Enforcing Long-Standing Public Charge Inadmissibility Law

Regulation promotes self-sufficiency and immigrant success

WASHINGTON — Today, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced a final rule that clearly defines long-standing law to better ensure that aliens seeking to enter and remain in the United States — either temporarily or permanently — are self-sufficient and rely on their own capabilities and the resources of family members, sponsors, and private organizations rather than on public resources.

This final rule amends DHS regulations by prescribing how DHS will determine whether an alien is inadmissible to the United States based on his or her likelihood of becoming a public charge at any time in the future, as set forth in the Immigration and Nationality Act. The final rule addresses U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) authority to permit an alien to submit a public charge bond in the context of adjustment of status applications. The rule also makes nonimmigrant aliens who have received certain public benefits above a specific threshold generally ineligible for extension of stay and change of status.

“For over a century, the public charge ground of inadmissibility has been part of our nation’s immigration laws. President Trump has delivered on his promise to the American people to enforce long-standing immigration law by defining the public charge inadmissibility ground that has been on the books for years,” said USCIS Acting Director Ken Cuccinelli. “Throughout our history, self-sufficiency has been a core tenet of the American dream. Self-reliance, industriousness, and perseverance laid the foundation of our nation and have defined generations of hardworking immigrants seeking opportunity in the United States ever since. Through the enforcement of the public charge inadmissibility law, we will promote these long-standing ideals and immigrant success.”

DHS has revised the definition of “public charge” to incorporate consideration of more kinds of public benefits received, which the Department believes will better ensure that applicants subject to the public charge inadmissibility ground are self-sufficient. The rule defines the term “public charge” to mean an individual who receives one or more designated public benefits for more than 12 months, in the aggregate, within any 36-month period (such that, for instance, receipt of two benefits in one month counts as two months). The rule further defines the term “public benefit” to include any cash benefits for income maintenance, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), most forms of Medicaid, and certain housing programs.

The regulation also excludes from the public benefits definition: public benefits received by individuals who are serving in active duty or in the Ready Reserve component of the U.S. armed forces, and their spouses and children; public benefits received by certain international adoptees and children acquiring U.S. citizenship; Medicaid for aliens under 21 and pregnant women; Medicaid for school-based services (including services provided under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act); and Medicaid benefits for emergency medical services.

This rule also makes certain nonimmigrant aliens in the United States who have received designated public benefits above the designated threshold ineligible for change of status and extension of stay if they received the benefits after obtaining the nonimmigrant status they seek to extend or from which they seek to change.

Importantly, this regulation does not apply to humanitarian-based immigration programs for refugees, asylees, Special Immigrant Juveniles (SIJs), certain trafficking victims (T nonimmigrants), victims of qualifying criminal activity (U nonimmigrants), or victims of domestic violence (VAWA self-petitioners), among others. 

This rule also explains how USCIS will exercise its discretionary authority, in limited circumstances, to offer an alien inadmissible only on the public charge ground the opportunity to post a public charge bond. The final rule sets the minimum bond amount at $8,100; the actual bond amount will be dependent on the individual’s circumstances.

This final rule supersedes the 1999 Interim Field Guidance on Deportability and Inadmissibility on Public Charge Grounds and goes into effect at 12:00 a.m. Eastern on Oct. 15, 60 days from the date of publication in the Federal Register. USCIS will apply the public charge inadmissibility final rule only to applications and petitions postmarked (or, if applicable, submitted electronically) on or after the effective date. Applications and petitions already pending with USCIS on the effective date of the rule (postmarked and accepted by USCIS) will be adjudicated based on the 1999 Interim Guidance.   

USCIS will provide information and additional details to the public as part of public outreach related to the implementation of this rule. In the coming weeks, USCIS will conduct engagement sessions for the public and other interested groups to ensure the public understands which benefits are included in the public charge inadmissibility rule and which are not.

For more information on USCIS and its programs, visit our website at uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Facebook and LinkedIn.

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