Update to Form I-360, Petition for Amerasian, Widow(er), or Special Immigrant; New Edition Dated 04/12/18

Purpose of Form

Use this form to classify an alien as:

  1. An Amerasian (Born after 12/31/1950 and before 10/23/1982);
  2. The widow(er) of a U.S. citizen;  
  3. The abused spouse or child of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident; 
  4. The abused parent of a U.S. citizen; or
  5.  A special immigrant. A special immigrant is defined as one of the following:
    1.  Religious Worker
    2.  Panama Canal Company Employee, Canal Zone Government Employee, U.S. Government in the Canal Zone Employee;
    3.  Physician;
    4.  International Organization or NATO-6 Employee or Family Member;  
    5.  Juvenile Declared Dependent on a juvenile court;
    6.  U.S. armed forces member;
    7.  Afghan or Iraqi national who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government as a translator;
    8.  Iraqi national who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government in Iraq or
    9.  An Afghan national who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government or the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan.

Number of Pages

Form 19; instructions 16.

Edition Date

12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the form and instructions.

Where to File

Please review the filing chart for the most current guidance on where to file your application. If you are filing at a Lockbox, read our filing tips.

Don’t forget to sign your form! We will reject any unsigned form.

Filing Fee

$435. You may pay the fee with a money order, personal check, or cashier’s check.  When filing at a USCIS Lockbox facility, you may also pay by credit card using Form G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transactions. If you pay by check, you must make your check payable to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Please note that service centers are not able to process credit card payments.

If you are required to pay a fee for your petition or are unable to submit your petition electronically, you may still follow the form instructions and submit the Form I-360 by mail.

The following individuals are exempt from paying the $435 fee:

  • Amerasians; (Box 1.A. on the form);
  • Self-petitioning abused spouses or children of U.S. citizens or permanent residents (Box 1.I. or Box 1.J. on the form);
  • Self-petitioning abused parents of U.S. citizens (Box 1.K. on the form);
  • Special Immigrant Juveniles (Box 1.C. on the form); or,
  • Iraqi nationals who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government in Iraq (Box 1.L. or Box 1.M. on the form)
  • Afghan nationals who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government in Afghanistan (Box 1.L. or Box 1.N. on the form).

Note: Religious Workers may not file Form I-360 concurrently with a Form I-485. 8 CFR 245.2(a)(2)(B); Cf. Ruiz-Diaz v. United States, 703 F.3d 483 (9th Cir. 2012).  A Religious Worker may file Form I-485 only after USCIS has approved the Form I-360.

Attestation for Special Immigrant Religious Worker Classification

All petitioners filing Form I-360 petitions for special immigrant religious workers are required to submit the employer attestation in Form I-360. If applicable, the petitioner is also required to submit the Religious Denomination Certification in Form I-360, which must be signed by the authorized representative of the religious organization within the denomination. Please refer to the form’s instructions for further details.

Widow(er)s of Deceased U.S. Citizens

At one time, section 201(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act provided that a citizen’s surviving spouse could file an immigrant visa petition if the citizen and surviving spouse had been married at least two years. On Oct. 28, 2009, section 568(c) of Public Law 111-83 amended the Immigration and Nationality Act so that you may be eligible to immigrate, even if you and your deceased spouse were married for less than 2 years when your spouse died. 

You must still file your Form I-360 no later than 2 years after the citizen’s death.

Your eligibility for classification as the widow(er) of a U.S. citizen on the basis of a Form I-360 that you file after your citizen spouse died ends if you remarry before you immigrate or adjust status.

If your deceased citizen spouse filed a Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, before dying, you do not need to file a Form I-360. Your spouse’s Form I-130 was automatically converted to a Form I-360. If your immigrant visa petition was originally filed as a Form I-130, your remarriage does not necessarily mean you cannot immigrate. Section 204(l) of the Immigration and Nationality Act permits USCIS to approve the petition as a Form I-130, even if you have remarried.    

Iraqi and Afghan nationals who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government in Iraq or Afghanistan

You may scan and email your petition with the required documents (preferably in pdf format) to nsci360sivapp@uscis.dhs.gov.

If you scan and email your Form I-360, include the email address you want USCIS to use to send your electronic receipt. If you do not include an email address with your form, we will send the receipt notice electronically to the email address from which the petition was submitted.

If you submit your petition by email, you must bring the same original, signed Form I-360 that was submitted with you to your consular interview.

Special Instructions

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Substantial Support from USCIS Fraud Detection Unit Leads to Convictions in Two Separate Immigration Fraud Cases

LOS ANGELES – This week, two immigration fraud perpetrators were sentenced to prison due to the considerable efforts of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Los Angeles Fraud Detection and National Security (FDNS) unit. Los Angeles FDNS immigration officers worked closely with law enforcement and intelligence community partners to resolve potential fraud, national security and public safety concerns, and to ensure exchange of current and comprehensive information. 

“Convictions in both cases send a powerful message to anyone trying to take advantage of our community or defraud the government,” said USCIS Los Angeles District Director Donna Campagnolo. “Fighting fraud and ensuring the integrity of our immigration system are top priorities for USCIS. We remain committed and vigilant in weeding out bad actors.”

On Wednesday, Jessica Godoy Ramos, 37, of Lynwood, California, was sentenced for stealing the identity of a New York attorney and filing immigration petitions on behalf of foreign nationals who believed she was a legitimate lawyer. Ramos was sentenced to 15 months in federal prison, and upon completion of the 15-month prison term, Ramos will spend six months in home detention. Calling the crimes “despicable,” presiding U.S. District Judge Dolly M. Gee also ordered Ramos to pay $29,693 in restitution to 16 identified victims.

Ramos accepted tens of thousands of dollars from dozens of aliens who sought her services in an attempt to obtain legal status in the United States. Using the name of the genuine attorney, Ramos filed immigration petitions on the behalf of some aliens, but in other cases, she never performed any services for her clients. Ramos also created counterfeit immigration parole documents to make it appear that she had successfully represented the aliens.

According to court documents, Ramos’ clients initially believed she was a legitimate immigration attorney, but several became suspicious when Ramos directed them to appear at USCIS offices for interviews – but they did not have any scheduled appointments.

The second sentencing, which took place yesterday, involved the owner of four schools. The owner enrolled hundreds of foreign nationals to fraudulently obtain immigration documents, which allowed them to remain in the United States as “students” – even though they rarely, if ever, attended classes. Hee Sun Shim , 54, of Hancock Park, Calif. was sentenced to 15 months in federal prison and ordered to forfeit more than $450,000.

Shim, along with two co-defendants, ran a “pay-to-stay” scheme through three schools in Koreatown: Prodee University/Neo-America Language School; Walter Jay M.D. Institute, an Educational Center; and the American College of Forensic Studies. A fourth school in Alhambra – Likie Fashion and Technology College – was also involved in the scheme, which ran for at least five years.

USCIS continually takes measures to detect and deter immigration benefit fraud and aggressively pursues benefit fraud cases in collaboration with federal law enforcement agencies. FDNS will continue playing a key role in USCIS efforts to safeguard the integrity of our immigration laws, protect American workers, and safeguard the homeland.

USCIS also encourages the public to make sure the person helping with an immigration case is authorized to give legal advice. Only an attorney or an accredited representative working for a Department of Justice (DOJ) recognized organization can give legal advice. For more information about avoiding immigration scams, visit our Avoid Scams webpage on uscis.gov.

For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis), and Facebook (/uscis).  

– USCIS –

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Update to Form I-907, Request for Premium Processing Service; New Edition Dated 04/11/18

Purpose of Form

Number of Pages

Form 7; instructions 7.

Edition Date

04/11/18. Starting 06/18/2018, we will only accept the 04/11/18 edition. Until then, you can use the 12/11/15 and 01/29/15 editions. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the form and instructions.

Where to File

The filing location for Form I-907 depends on whether you are requesting premium processing for Form I-129 or Form I-140.

Please visit the Form I-129 or Form I-140 webpages to find the correct address. Do not send requests for premium processing to a USCIS Lockbox facility.

Don’t forget to sign your form! We will reject any unsigned form.

Filing Fee

$1,225. This fee is required in addition to all other filing fees required by the application or petition you are submitting. If you are paying by check, please make it payable to U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

Special Instructions

Religious Workers (Form I-129 R-1 classification): We will accept your Form I-907 if you have previously completed a successful on-site inspection at the beneficiary’s place of employment.

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E-Verify Outage and New Features

E-Verify, the free system that allows employers to confirm the eligibility of their employees to work in the United States, will be unavailable from April 20 at 9 p.m. until April 22 at 11:59 p.m. Eastern, while we implement system enhancements. For more information on how the outage will affect the creation of E-Verify cases see the fact sheet on our website.

On April 23, we will release a modernized version of E-Verify that will help users enter correct information, increase the speed and accuracy of the employment eligibility verification process, decrease Tentative Nonconfirmations (TNCs), and reduce manual verifications.  

The improvements include:

  • Text and visual features to help users accurately enter information into E-Verify;
  • Real-time feedback to help users quickly correct data entry errors;
  • Auto-scrolling to move to the next section on the page;
  • Fewer steps to create or close a case;
  • The ability to upload pictures of documents from a smartphone or tablet;
  • Alerts when data is entered that may lead to a TNC;
  • Updating language to use the same terms as the Form I-9;
  • Improved data matching to reduce TNCs and manual verifications; and
  • Enhancements to USCIS security and employer accountability features.

We gathered feedback from E-Verify users to make these improvements; please visit the new version of E-Verify on April 23. Read the user manual or job aids to learn to use the system. Log in or enroll  at E-Verify.gov.

For more information about USCIS in general, please visit uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis and @EVerify), YouTube (/uscis), Instagram (/uscis) and Facebook (/uscis).

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Update to Form G-325A, Biographic Information (for Deferred Action); dated 03/29/18

Purpose of Form

Use this form to provide biographic information and include it with the application or petition you are submitting to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Number of Pages

Edition Date

03/29/18. Starting 06/11/2018, we will only accept the 03/29/18 edition. Until then, you can use the 06/01/15 edition. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the form and instructions.

Where to File

You file this form only as instructed on another immigration application or petition.

Don’t forget to sign your form! We will reject and return any unsigned form.

Filing Fee

Special Instructions

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New E-Verify.gov Website a User-Friendly Source to Verify Employment Eligibility

New E-Verify.gov Website a User-Friendly Source to Verify Employment Eligibility 

WASHINGTON—U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) today announced the launch of our new website, E-Verify.gov. This is the authoritative source for information on electronic employment eligibility verification. E-Verify.gov is for employers, employees and the general public.

The user-friendly website provides information about E-Verify and Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, including employee rights and employer responsibilities in the employment verification process. E-Verify.gov allows employers to enroll in E-Verify directly and permits current users to access their accounts. Individuals with myE-Verify accounts can also access their accounts through E-Verify.gov.

“For the past decade, E-Verify has been the cornerstone of our continued commitment to helping employers maintain a legal workforce,” said USCIS Director L. Francis Cissna. “E-Verify.gov now allows users to better understand and navigate through the employment verification process.”

E-Verify is a free, easy-to-use internet-based system. Employers can access E-Verify anytime, anywhere directly from a web browser. Nearly all employees are confirmed as work-authorized instantly or within 24 hours. The system, which has nearly 800,000 enrolled employers, compares information from an employee’s Form I-9 to records available to the Department of Homeland Security and the Social Security Administration to verify authorization to work in the U.S.

On April 18, 2017, President Trump signed the Buy American and Hire American executive order to help reduce illegal immigration and preserve jobs for U.S. workers. To support these objectives, USCIS encourages all U.S. employers to verify all new hires through E-Verify.  

For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis and @EVerify), YouTube (/uscis), Facebook (/uscis), and Instagram (@USCIS).

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USCIS Reaches FY 2019 H-1B Cap

USCIS has reached the congressionally-mandated 65,000 H-1B visa cap for fiscal year 2019. USCIS has also received a sufficient number of H-1B petitions to meet the 20,000 visa U.S. advanced degree exemption, known as the master’s cap.

The agency will reject and return filing fees for all unselected cap-subject petitions that are not prohibited multiple filings (PDF, 119 KB).

USCIS will continue to accept and process petitions that are otherwise exempt from the cap.  Petitions filed for current H-1B workers who have been counted previously against the cap, and who still retain their cap number, will also not be counted toward the FY 2019 H-1B cap. USCIS will continue to accept and process petitions filed to:

  • Extend the amount of time a current H-1B worker may remain in the United States;
  • Change the terms of employment for current H-1B workers;
  • Allow current H-1B workers to change employers; and
  • Allow current H-1B workers to work concurrently in a second H-1B position.

U.S. businesses use the H-1B program to employ foreign workers in occupations that require specialized knowledge.

We encourage H-1B applicants to subscribe to the H-1B Cap Season email updates located on the H-1B Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 Cap Season page.

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Undeliverable Permanent Resident and Employment Authorization Cards and Travel Documents to be Destroyed After 60 Days

Starting April 2, USCIS will destroy Permanent Resident Cards, Employment Authorization Cards and Travel Documents returned as undeliverable by the U.S. Postal Service after 60 business days if USCIS is not contacted by the document’s intended recipient to provide the correct address.

USCIS encourages applicants to report a change of address within 10 days of relocation using the procedures outlined at uscis.gov/addresschange.   

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USCIS and CBP to Implement Form I-129 Pilot Program for Canadian L-1 Nonimmigrants

From April 30, 2018, to Oct. 31, 2018, the USCIS California Service Center (CSC) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Blaine, Washington, port of entry (POE) will implement a joint agency pilot program for Canadian citizens seeking L-1 nonimmigrant status under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). This pilot is designed to facilitate the adjudication and admission process of Canadians traveling to the U.S. as L-1 nonimmigrants.

DHS regulations permit an employer to file an L petition on behalf of a Canadian citizen in conjunction with the Canadian citizen’s application for admission to the United States. Petitioners choosing to participate in the joint agency pilot program will be asked to:

  • Submit Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker, and supporting evidence to the CSC before the Canadian citizen seeks nonimmigrant L-1 admission to the United States through the Blaine POE; and
  • Use a cover sheet annotated with “Canadian L” to ensure quick identification of the Form I-129 and for any correspondence thereafter, such as a response to a request for evidence (RFE).

A petitioner who chooses not to participate in the Pilot Program may continue to file its L-1 petition on behalf of a Canadian citizen with CBP at the Blaine POE. In such a case, CBP will accept the petition but will adjudicate it at the next Class A POE.

About the Pilot Program

For those who choose to participate in the pilot program, USCIS will receive fees, issue a Form I-797C receipt notice, and adjudicate the Form I-129. If USCIS needs additional evidence, USCIS will send a request for evidence (RFE) to the petitioner.

CBP will continue to make the final determination on whether a Canadian L-1 applicant is admissible to the United States. Applicants participating in the pilot and seeking an immediate determination of admissibility must bring a copy of the petition approval notice for the Form I-129 when seeking admission to the United States at the Blaine POE.

If the petitioner chooses to send the applicant to the Blaine POE before USCIS makes a decision on the Form I-129, there may be delays while USCIS remotely adjudicates the form. In such a case, the applicant must bring a copy of the petition receipt notice for the Form I-129 and await adjudication of the Form I-129.

If a petitioner chooses not to file the Form I-129 in advance with USCIS, the filing may continue to be made with CBP at the Blaine POE, but CBP will adjudicate it during the pilot at the nearest Class A POE. The beneficiary may apply for admission at any designated Class A CBP POE optimized for processing L-1 petitions for Canadian citizen beneficiaries. Accordingly, petitioners can still choose to have CBP adjudicate their petitions at the time an applicant appears at any CBP-designated Class A POE or pre-clearance airport (PC). The three optimized stations nearest to Blaine are Class A POEs Point Roberts, Washington, and Sumas, Washington, and the Vancouver, Washington, PC.

CBP and USCIS strongly encourage petitioners participating in the L-1 pilot program to file L-1 nonimmigrant petitions with USCIS as far in advance of travel as possible. The L-1 nonimmigrant pilot program for Canadian citizens will allow both agencies to determine the efficiency of the program’s procedures, identify shortcomings, and develop operational improvements. During the six-month pilot, stakeholders may communicate and provide feedback to USCIS through USCIS-IGAOutreach@uscis.dhs.gov. Once the pilot is complete, USCIS will seek feedback from stakeholders before considering extending the program concept to other POEs.

About L-1 Canadians

Under existing law, a Canadian citizen may apply for admission as an L-1 nonimmigrant by presenting a petitioning employer’s Form I-129 to an immigration officer at a Class A port of entry or pre-clearance airport. Alternatively, an L-1 petitioner may choose to file a Form I-129 for a Canadian citizen with USCIS, seeking to classify the individual as eligible for L-1 nonimmigrant status. If the petitioner chooses to file its petition with USCIS and USCIS approves the Form I-129, the qualifying Canadian citizen may then apply at a POE for admission to the United States in L-1 status.

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New Version of N-300, Application to File Declaration of Intent. New Edition Dated 03/13/18.

Purpose of Form

Use this form if you are a permanent resident and want to declare your intent to become a U.S. citizen. This form is not required for naturalization, but may be required by some states if you wish to conduct certain business with that state.

Number of Pages

Form 8; instructions 8.

Edition Date

03/13/18.  Starting 05/28/2018, we will only accept the 03/13/18 edition.  Until then, you can use the 12/23/16 edition. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the form and instructions.

Where to File

USCIS Dallas Lockbox

For U.S. Postal Service (USPS):

USCIS
P.O. Box 650809
Dallas, TX 75265

For FedEx, UPS, and DHL deliveries:

USCIS
Attn: Form N-300
2501 S State Hwy 121 Business
Suite 400
Lewisville, TX 75067

Filing Tips for Form N-300, Application to File Declaration of Intention

Complete all sections of the form. We will reject the form if these fields are missing:

  • Part 1 – Information About You
    • Your 9 Digit A-Number
  • Part 3 – Interpreter’s Contact Information, Certification, and Signature (if applicable)
    • Interpreter’s Signature
  • Part 4 – Contact Information, Declaration, and Signature of the Person Who Prepared This Application, if Other Than the Applicant (if applicable)
    • Preparer’s Signature

Don’t forget to sign your form! We will reject any unsigned form.

Filing Fee

Special Instructions

Attorney or representative: You may be represented, at no expense to the U.S. government, by an attorney or other duly authorized representative. Your representative must submit Form G-28, Notice of Entry or Appearance as Attorney or Representative, with your Form N-300. Your representative may also submit Form G-28 at the time of your interview.

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